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VSH Transforming Lives through Permanent Supportive Housing

Virginia Supportive Housing (VSH) is a not-for-profit that transforms lives and communities by providing proven permanent solutions to homelessness.  VSH success rate is over 90 percent and Development Director Heather Orrock attributes that success to the integrated approach VSH offers its constituents.

“We provide permanent supportive housing,” explains Orrock, “which is much more than just finding people a place to live.  Our services include life skills education, mental health support and case management.”

Orrock has been working for three years to increase the numbers of individual donors for VSH.  The fundraising software Orrock uses to manage her efforts is Sage Fundraising 50. “All of our donations are tracked through Sage Fundraising 50,” Orrock says.  “It allows me to view donor history and provides me with the flexibility to tailor communication and outreach to donors based on their preferences. “

One example is providing donors who wish to take advantage of the Commonwealth of Virginia’s Neighborhood Assistance Program (NAP) tax credit with information on claiming the credit.  She can track requests for information and respond through Sage Fundraising 50.

When Orrock took the position at VSH three years ago, she was pleased to find out that she would be supported on Sage Fundraising 50 by JMT Consulting.  “I had worked with JMT while at another position and I loved working with them.  They are very knowledgeable about the product and have always been responsive.”

Another advantage of using Sage Fundraising 50 that Orrock likes is that it provides institutional knowledge.  “By that I mean we’re preserving information about our donors in a way that will help us now and in the future.  We didn’t have that kind of history before.  It will allow us to communicate and work with our donors based on their activities and their preferences.”

Orrock has high praise for JMT’s annual conference Innovate, “I’ve attended a couple, the most recent in Boston and I look forward to going again next year if possible.”

“It is a great compliment to know that our customers enjoy working with us and they are delighted to have multiple opportunities to do so,” comments JMT Consulting’s CEO Jacqueline Tiso, “and it’s very fulfilling to help an organization like Virginia Supportive Housing because they have such a powerful positive and lasting impact on people’s lives.”

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